Top Stories

It is an "illusion" to think key Brexit legislation will have an "untroubled passage" through the House of Lords, a Tory former chancellor has said.

Failure to incorporate the EU charter of fundamental rights into UK law after Brexit sends out "a really strange message" about the attitude of the Conservative Party, a senior Tory has said.

The House of Lords could face the prospect of fundamental reform if peers attempt to hamper Brexit, prominent Tory hardliner Jacob Rees-Mogg has warned.

The anti-Brexit cause may be facing a daunting task, says Stefan Stern, but a clear course to stop this madness still lies ahead

Boris Johnson's comment that the Leave campaign under-estimated when it claimed Brexit would allow an extra £350m to be spent on the NHS weekly has been branded "ridiculous".

European Council president Donald Tusk has demanded more clarity from prime minister Theresa May over her plans for Brexit - and again held open the possibility of the UK changing its mind.

Theresa May has been accused of lying to the British people by a senior ally of German chancellor Angela Merkel over the plan to restore dark blue British passports after Brexit.

Boris Johnson has said the Brexit campaign's claim of an extra £350m a week to spend on the NHS was an underestimate - but his working out shows why the original figure was a lie.

The New European’s columnist JAMES BALL argues that we need to start working out who to blame when Brexit doesn’t go to plan

MITCH BENN on the real problem with Toby Young’s unsuitability for the Office for Students

BONNIE GREER gives her diagnosis of Donald J. Trump

When stand-up, fantasy football fanatic and novelist David Baddiel first became famous hecklers were in the audience. Now, talking to NATHANIEL TAPLEY, he explains how trolls have become a new, nastier version of the loud-mouth in the crowd

Ukip leader Henry Bolton has ended his "romantic relationship" with his controversial model girlfriend, but still faces a backlash from senior figures within his party.

Amidst the chaos of Brexit comes clarity from afar. Italian journalist and Anglophile PAOLA PEDUZZI provides a plaintive view of her beloved UK

So, will the Big Bad Wolff blow the Trump White House down?

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has again ruled out his party backing a second EU referendum even in the face of growing public support.

SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon has told hardline Brexiteers “you’ve had your chance and failed”.

UKIP’s leader Henry Bolton has been called on to step down after his model girlfriend reportedly sent highly offensive text messages about Meghan Markle.

The stock markets are booming but how long can the party last? ANGELA JAMESON investigates mounting worries over how long the bull will run for

Pulitzer Prize winner ALBERT SCARDINO assesses the mental health of Donald Trump, and the chances of an intervention

Readers of The New European react through our letters pages to this week’s cabinet reshuffle.

The savaging that Milo Yiannopoulos’ awful book received at the hands of its editor provided joy for many. But CHARLIE CONNELLY had a very personal, and pressing, reason not to join in the ridicule

The New European’s Editor-at-Large, Alastair Campbell, on the reasons the BBC is dancing to the tune of Brexit...

The latest New European podcast is available now including an exclusive interview with former Europe Minister Denis MacShane.

Steve Anglesey counts down the worst Brexiteers of the week

For this week’s podcast we asked you what you’d put in a hamper that truly represented Brexit.

Scotland's first minister has described delays to amendments to key Brexit legislation as "absolutely disgraceful".

A senior Conservative MP demands Theresa May appoints a 'minister for Hard Brexit' to her team as he claims she had "promised".

MICHAEL WHITE on a muted reshuffle and why waiting for Corbyn is a waste of time

Turkey’s trajectory under Erdogan is a disaster for her people and a big loss for Europe, but we must not write the country off, argues former Europe Minister DENIS MACSHANE.

Culture

France might be rugby league minnows – as their World Cup campaign has demonstrated – but, as MICK O’HARE explains, the sport in the country has had to fight for its very survival

Danish philosopher, May 5, 1813 - November 11, 1855

Matriarchal, sunkissed, homespun, carefree... the Missoni brand (and the family with a backstory to match) seem the uplifting antithesis of the clinical, corporatised world of fashion, says SUNA ERDEM. But is that enough?

It might like there is little new to see in Picasso’s work, says VIV GROSKOP. But a current exhibition focuses on an unusual angle... his daughter as muse

When the Beatles turned up in Hamburg, rock ‘n’ roll was on its knees, says IAN WALKER. By the time they had ended their stay in the city, its future was guaranteed

Hidden away in a sleepy village in southern France lies the Palais Ideal, one of Europe’s most remarkable structures. With a new film about it in production, JULIAN SHEA tells the story behind this amazing construction and the man who built it

Georgia spawned Stalin, the monster who forever poisoned the legacy of the Russian Revolution. But it also produced a tantalising alternative vision of what that revolution could have led to. JUSTIN REYNOLDS explores the forgotten history of the fleeting Democratic Republic of Georgia, which offered a flicker of hope before it was extinguished

A sterile-sounding genre is revived by an injection of illicit creativity. SOPHIA DEBOICK on the musicians who put the soul into rural America’s music

In his most celebrated poems, Rupert Brooke gave a classic evocation of England. But, argues CHARLIE CONNELLY, his work has a very European context

Britain’s unofficial poet laureate Tony Harrison tells ANTHONY CLAVANE about how the divisions exposed by his landmark poem, V, are as raw now as ever

The Belgian town of Doel should have been wiped off the map more than a decade ago. The threat of destruction still hangs over it, but for now street art is sustaining it. Photographer Bradley Wood went along to capture the town before it vanishes for good

Facing upheaval in Europe, modern art found a very special refuge in New York. So, says CLAUDIA PRITCHARD, a new blockbuster MoMA exhibition in Paris represents something of a homecoming

As the slaughter of the Great War intensified, and certainties that had preceded the conflict faded away, an imaginative and rebellious spirit emerged. SOPHIA DEBOICK looks back on a year when the world hung in the ​balance

The murder of Marion Crane, as she took a shower at the Bates Motel, was one of the turning points of the 20th century, argues CHRIS SULLIVAN

From precocious, early success, the British painter’s career moved to subsequent obscurity, via misfortune and prejudice. But, as FLORENCE HALLETT reports, a new exhibition reclaims him as one of the 20th century’s great artists

Podcast

Trending

Newsletter Sign Up

Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter