Belfast

It was almost 35 years ago yet I still can’t believe my dad let me do it. I can’t have been much more than 14 years old.

The European Union’s starry logo glistens in the sun on a plaque by a roundabout just outside Longford, a market town about 80 miles from Dublin in the Irish Midlands.

Old bigotries dissolve, but they are quickly replaced by new ones if the vacuum is only filled by economic failure and inequality, by uncertainty compounded by weak leadership.

In this column’s unflinching commitment to finding fragments of silver lining in the debris that has been the Year of Brexit it is torn between Emmanuel Macron and Dominic Cummings.

There is anger in the UK’s aerospace industry at the government’s dereliction of duty over such a thriving sector

The Brexit vote has divided us in a new way between the Optimists and the Pessimists. Just to complicate things, both tendencies exist in both Remain and Leave.

Anathema to many British voters and stereotyped as inflexible but the DUP have a deserved reputation for dexterity and find themselves as a wildcard in the Brexit mix

With the clock ticking not only on Article 50, but also a UK general election, is Ireland the part of Europe with most to fear from Brexit’s fallout?

Pro-EU centrist Emmanuel Macron will face far-right Marine Le Pen in a head-to-head battle for the French presidency.

‘Deep in the psyche of Irish Republicanism is the Holy Grail of an all island republic, and of the right of republicans to take up arms to achieve it’

Britain’s chief negotiator during the peace process, which successfully settled the question of a united Ireland, explains how Brexit has reignited the issue

“We already miss you,” said European Council president Donald Tusk. “Thank you and goodbye.”

They grew up in the same area and went to the same school, but their views could not be more different. Here, frontman of The Farm Peter Hooton tries to teach new UKIP leader Paul Nuttall a few lessons from their roots

When the triggering of Article 50 comes before the Commons many MPs will have a difficult decision - vote with their constituents or vote with the party whip.

Brexit is the result of an English delusion, a crisis of identity resulting from a failure to come to terms with the loss of empire and the end of its own exceptionalism, argues Cambridge University professor Nicholas Boyle

The threat of a hard border in Ireland is not a side issue in the Brexit debate, but a looming catastrophe for us all

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