Dublin

The border issue may have been fudged for now, but when it comes to Ireland, much else has become abundantly clear, says DEIRDRE HEENAN.

MICHAEL WHITE tries to look on the bright side of the fallout from May’s Brexit fudge.

London and Dublin have clashed over whether the Brexit agreement intended to trigger trade talks is legally binding or not.

A crunch Brexit meeting is “not a deadline” according to Number 10 as talks over the Irish border continue to stall progress.

The Irish border stalemate has deepened with Liam Fox saying a final decision cannot be made until a trade deal is struck.

Dublin has intensified the pressure on Number 10 declaring Brexit will not progress until an agreement about the border is struck.

It was almost 35 years ago yet I still can’t believe my dad let me do it. I can’t have been much more than 14 years old.

Our culture correspondent on an author reaping the rewards of authentic language, gripping life stories and taking inspiration from a murderous poodle.

The European Union’s starry logo glistens in the sun on a plaque by a roundabout just outside Longford, a market town about 80 miles from Dublin in the Irish Midlands.

Old bigotries dissolve, but they are quickly replaced by new ones if the vacuum is only filled by economic failure and inequality, by uncertainty compounded by weak leadership.

Even without the complications of Brexit, Britain’s economy is in serious peril. But with attention elsewhere, is anyone in power actually listening?

Did you spot the Canadian angle on the British government’s latest Cunning Plan, the one intended to make good Theresa May’s pledge to leave the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice on Brexit Day without doing serious “no deal” harm to the economy?

The New European has finally decided to publish one of persistent Brexiteer Robert Miller’s letters. But was it worth the wait?

Prime Minister Theresa May has become a much diminished figure on the world stage

An ice cold San Miguel on a Spanish beach, or a glass of a Bordeaux in a Paris restaurant might seem like the ultimate in European drinks, but these ten classics are underrated examples of the continent’s cocktails, cordials and concentrates.

Everyone is buying Europe just when Britain is selling

Andrew Scott is magnificent as the Prince of Denmark in Robert Icke’s Shakespeare production

Ulysses is the story of a place – Dublin – as much anything else. So why did James Joyce have to leave the city in order to write his masterpiece?

The Conservatives deal with the DUP risks undermining the delicate balance of power-sharing in Northern Ireland, says leading Sinn Féin figure

Suddenly he is everyone’s favourite Uncle Jeremy - a man on the threshhold of power. Next time he may be unlucky enough to win

Whatever the outcome of negotiations, Ireland’s foreign minister cannot foresee relations between Britain and Ireland getting better

Now, he’s on his way over – but what really changed his mind?

The dangers of the presidential-style government Theresa May and her ‘team’ are seeking for the UK

With the clock ticking not only on Article 50, but also a UK general election, is Ireland the part of Europe with most to fear from Brexit’s fallout?

After a damaging Brexit, would the EU have us back? We take the temperature in the continent’s capitals, to gauge how different countries might respond to a British U-turn on Brexit

‘Deep in the psyche of Irish Republicanism is the Holy Grail of an all island republic, and of the right of republicans to take up arms to achieve it’

UK’s attractiveness to overseas investors is being challenged by Brexit

In these increasingly strange days it seems Westminster’s undead, tempted by a whiff of Brexit flesh, are marching back on to centre stage

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