Ireland

Brexit is the result of an English delusion, a crisis of identity resulting from a failure to come to terms with the loss of empire and the end of its own exceptionalism, argues Cambridge University professor Nicholas Boyle

Why did the EU referendum happen and how could it be overturned? Brexit is not a done deal and this is how we can fight it

The Brexiteers’ claim that we would be £350m a week better off outside the EU has been widely ridiculed - but it worked and they are at it again

For 70 years, the European Union, and its previous incarnations, has been an undeniable force for peace

The threat of a hard border in Ireland is not a side issue in the Brexit debate, but a looming catastrophe for us all

The dearth of tech talent: just one more reason why freedom of movement has never been more important

Brexit power 100: influential figures from the worlds of politics, the media, entertainment, finance and football, and from all sides of the debate

With Brexit, and the election of president Trump, UK-US relations are set to enter a new era - for Britain it will be one of impotence and desperation

No one wears their poppy with more pride that I do. But in the row over whether international footballers should wear them, Fifa are right. And the hot air the issue has prompted tells you everything about what is wrong with Britain today

The big lie is that there has been a big silence on immigration, I cannot think of any issue on which there has been so much noise, says Denis MacShane

The Scottish position post-Brexit remains very different from that of Westminster, but no less confused, says Maurice Smith

Universities have much to gain from membership of the European Union and precious little to look forward to as a result of Brexit, says Martin McQuillan

The Norway model – of life outside the EU – is one that excites many Brexiteers, and comforts many Remainers. But here, Anne Elizabeth Stie and Jarle Trondal, two of the country’s leading political experts, explain why the Nordic nation is on a path that may satisfy neither side – one that relegates its politicians to lobbyists and puts the bureaucrats in control.

Fifty-six per cent of people in the north of Ireland voted to remain in the EU. Martin McGuinness, the deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland, explains why Brexit is an affront to democracy and explores its consequences

Trending

E-Edition

Newsletter Sign Up