Boris Johnson says UK is having its cake and eating it over Brexit deal

Prime Minister Boris Johnson signs the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement at 10 Downing Street, W

Prime Minister Boris Johnson signs the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement at 10 Downing Street, Westminster - Credit: PA

Boris Johnson has claimed that his post-Brexit trade deal with the European Union is the "cakiest treaty" - and that the UK was able to "have its cake and eat it" after all.

The prime minister, in an interview with the BBC's Laura Kuenssberg, said that while there "will be changes" for people come January 1st, there would be no barriers when it comes to post-Brexit trade.

Kuenssberg challenged this as "factually untrue", alluding to new checks on the transport of plants and animals across the border, extra paperwork to take your dog on holiday and the need for musicians to obtain a work visa to perform abroad.

Boris Johnson in Downing Street

The Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks to President of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen via video link from the Cabinet room after completing the Brexit deal - Credit: Andrew Parsons / No10 Downing Street

But Johnson said: "The deal allows us to go our own way and have free trade with the EU.

"From the point of view of UK exporters, they'll now only have one set of forms to fill out around the whole world.


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"People said you couldn't have free trade with the EU unless you conformed with the EU's laws, but that is what we've achieved. I think you will concede that.

"This is the cakiest treaty", he said.

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On the topic of barriers for UK financial services, he claimed the City of London was the "greatest financial centre on earth", and that it would "adapt and prosper mightily".



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