David Cameron blamed ‘foam-flecked Faragist’ Michael Gove for loss of EU referendum

Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster Michael Gove leaving a Pret a Manger in Westminster. Photograph: Victoria Jones/PA.

Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster Michael Gove leaving a Pret a Manger in Westminster. Photograph: Victoria Jones/PA.

Former prime minister David Cameron was ‘incandescent’ with rage after losing the EU referendum, a new book claims.

The former Tory leader reportedly headed to Oxfordshire on the day after the EU referendum loss, calling on the then Tory MP Hugo Swire and his wife to join them for “plenty of booze”.
The Mirror reports the claims, which come from a new book written by Swire’s wife and Cameron family friend Sasha Swire.
Swire said that Cameron was ­“incandescent” with rage about the result, with his fury was “almost entirely” directed at Gove.
In Cameron’s own memories he branded Gove a “foam-flecked Faragist”.
The Diary of an MP’s Wife: Inside and Outside Power also reveals that Cameron thought Johnson’s Brexit support was all about leadership ambitions.
Johnson claimed he thought Brexit would be “crushed like the toad beneath the barrow” just nine minutes before he put himself at the head of the Leave campaign.
“David tells us that even when he switched sides, Boris was telling him via texts that Brexit ‘would be crushed like the toad beneath the harrow’ and that he (David) would survive.”
The claims were supported by extracts from Craig Oliver, the former Downing Street communications director, who wrote something similar in 2016.
At the time he said of Cameron: “He says Boris is really a ‘confused Inner’, and their previous conversations confirmed that view to him, with discussions about tactics to get the best possible deal. 
“He actually said he thought we could leave and still have a seat on the European Council – still making decisions.”



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