Tory politician backs calls for Rishi Sunak to replace Boris Johnson as prime minister

Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak (left) and Prime Minister Boris Johnson leave 10 Downing Street. Photograph: Stefan R...

Chancellor Rishi Sunak (L) and prime minister Boris Johnson leave 10 Downing Street - Credit: Stefan Rousseau/PA

A Tory politician has urged colleagues to back Rishi Sunak as Boris Johnson's replacement at No 10.

Senior Tory MSP, Murdo Fraser, retweeted a message which praised the chancellor and criticised Boris Johnson.

The post, which was written by Herald columnist Iain Macwhirter read: "Rishi Sunak reaches the parts Boris cannot.

"He’s as fluent and convincing as Tony Blair used to be. And he is BAME to boot.

"Tories have their next PM-in-waiting when Boris gives up the ghost.


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"Labour could be out for a generation."

The post comes after Scottish Tory leader Douglas Ross criticised his Westminster colleagues for making the case for independence “more effectively in London than it ever could be in Edinburgh”.

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Popularity polls north of the border show Sunak as being more popular than Johnson while a survey by pollsters Redfield & Wilton Strategies found more people think he should be prime minister than Johnson.

Sunak shrugged off suggestions he should take a tilt at the top job on Sky News.

Speaking on the Kay Burley @ Breakfast show, Sunak said: "I think the job I have is hard enough and I see up-close what the prime minister has to deal with every day. It's not an envious task and he does it admirably well.

MORE: Piers Morgan calls Rishi Sunak out on coronavirus testing figures comment

"These are very difficult time and I am grateful that we have his leadership and I think the country should be grateful for that as well."

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