Remain’s focus should now turn to an even bigger issue - climate change

PUBLISHED: 14:01 10 January 2020 | UPDATED: 14:01 10 January 2020

Climate change protesters block the traffic outside the Australian Embassy in London. Photograph: Jonathan Brady/PA Wire.

Climate change protesters block the traffic outside the Australian Embassy in London. Photograph: Jonathan Brady/PA Wire.

Readers believe the Australian fires are a sign that more focus needs to go on climate change - and that Remainers can play a part in the fight.

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For over three years now the UK has, in effect, fiddled while Rome burned with endless talk about deals and borders and "taking back control". Ignoring the elephant in the room, climate change.

The Australian fires are demonstrating that the climate is really in control and must be the priority focus globally.

As a fairly coherent group, the task for Remainers now should be to push for parliament to present a united, completely cross-party stance on tackling climate change.

What use are trade deals and borders when the world is burning?

Pat Brandwood

Broadstone

Scott Morrison, prime minister of Australia, says there is no evidence linking bush fires to climate change. He refuses to downgrade the Australian coal industry. Australia is the third biggest exporter of fossil fuels in the world and the proportion of electricity made by coal is 75% in Australia, while being just 2% in Britain.

These are the sort of people we are going to be invited to trade with when we leave the EU.

James Zambonini

Hitchin

Some may question what the purpose of The New European will be once stopping Brexit no longer exists as a campaign objective, but for me the reason to keep buying the paper week in, week out, long after the 'pop-up' tag vanished from your covers, has never been the political comment and analysis - incisive and erudite as this is, there are always copious opinions going for free on the internet - so much as the intelligent and eclectic content of the cultural pages, whether covering music, history, art or sport, that persistently captivates, inspires and educates me each week. The politics will continue long after January 31, of course, as Brexit conspicuously fails to obediently 'get done', but it's the latter that will keep me buying and reading the paper for as long as you can keep publishing it.

Tom Hawkins

Stockport

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Almost four years after its creation The New European goes from strength to strength across print and online, offering a pro-European perspective on Brexit and reporting on the political response to the coronavirus outbreak, climate change and international politics. But we can only rebalance the right wing extremes of much of the UK national press with your support. If you value what we are doing, you can help us by making a contribution to the cost of our journalism.

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