Brexit has divided the country like never before, says David Dimbleby

PUBLISHED: 14:32 17 September 2019 | UPDATED: 15:23 17 September 2019

David Dimbleby. Photograph: Matt Crossick/PA.

David Dimbleby. Photograph: Matt Crossick/PA.

PA Archive/PA Images

Broadcasting veteran David Dimbleby says he has never seen the country 'so divided' as it is over Brexit.

Become a Supporter

The New European is proud of its journalism and we hope you are proud of it too. If you value what we are doing, you can help us by making a contribution to the cost of our journalism

Members of the media and protesters outside the Supreme Court in London. Picture: Kirsty O'Connor/PA WireMembers of the media and protesters outside the Supreme Court in London. Picture: Kirsty O'Connor/PA Wire

Dimbleby, who has hosted the BBC's coverage of every general election since 1979, spoke to protesters outside the Supreme Court as justices were asked to rule that Boris Johnson's decision to prorogue parliament for five weeks was unlawful.

Dimbleby said: "I lived through Suez, the miners' strike, I lived through the poll tax debate and the trouble then. I lived through the Iraq demonstrations - I've never seen the country so divided as this.

"The next six weeks are clearly critical. I've never known the country so seriously riven by argument."

He said the court case was "not just dramatic - it's really, really important for all our futures".

Protesters hold banners outside the Supreme Court in London, Tuesday Sept. 17, 2019. The Supreme Court is set to decide whether Prime Minister Boris Johnson broke the law when he suspended Parliament on Sept. 9, sending lawmakers home until Oct. 14 Ñ just over two weeks before the U.K. is due to leave the European Union. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)Protesters hold banners outside the Supreme Court in London, Tuesday Sept. 17, 2019. The Supreme Court is set to decide whether Prime Minister Boris Johnson broke the law when he suspended Parliament on Sept. 9, sending lawmakers home until Oct. 14 Ñ just over two weeks before the U.K. is due to leave the European Union. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

"The prime minister is accused of lying to the Queen - let's put it bluntly - and getting parliament suspended without good reason, and that's big potatoes, it has to be," he continued.

People were lined on the streets outside the court in the heart of Westminster, holding signs saying "defend democracy", "reopen parliament" and "they misled the Queen".

They included someone dressed as the Incredible Hulk who was seen being "arrested" by another in a Robocop costume, just as proceedings began.

The man beneath the Robocop costume, Charlie Rome, 35, said: "Robocop, he stood for the rule of law in a kind of dystopian future where there was corruption rife across the police and the corporations.

"I think it's quite fitting at this quite worrying juncture in our parliamentary democracy."

Referring to his outfit, Rome added: "The irony of being in a tin foil hat is not lost on me!"

Become a Supporter

The New European is proud of its journalism and we hope you are proud of it too. We believe our voice is important - both in representing the pro-EU perspective and also to help rebalance the right wing extremes of much of the UK national press. If you value what we are doing, you can help us by making a contribution to the cost of our journalism.

Become a supporter

You've seen the news, now discover the story

The New European is committed to providing in-depth analysis of the Brexit process, its implications and progress as well as celebrating European life.

Try 13 weeks for £13

Latest Articles

Most Read

latest issue

ANTI-BREXIT EVENTS

Find your nearest anti-Brexit campaigning activities, talks, protests and events nationwide.

Newsletter Sign Up

The New European weekly newsletter
Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy