French domestic violence conviction is reason Geoffrey Boycott says he's a Brexiteer

PUBLISHED: 08:48 10 September 2019 | UPDATED: 12:16 10 September 2019

TV Presenter Allison Mitchell (left) interviews Geoffrey Boycott during day five of the fourth Ashes Test at Emirates Old Trafford, Manchester.

TV Presenter Allison Mitchell (left) interviews Geoffrey Boycott during day five of the fourth Ashes Test at Emirates Old Trafford, Manchester.

PA Wire/PA Images

Geoffrey Boycott has claimed that the judge that convicted him of domestic violence is one of the reasons he wants to leave the EU.

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Boycott, who had been given a knighthood of by Theresa May, appeared on BBC Radio 4 Today and was expressing his pleasure at being awarded the honour.

But the mood soon changed when Martha Kearney asked 78-year-old Boycott why it took him so long to get an honour.

Laughing he told Kearney: "It's asking like when I'm going to die, I have no idea!"

The presenter then suggested that his 1998 conviction of assaulting his girlfriend could have something to do with it, only for the mood to change.

"25 years ago, love, in a French court," snapped Boycott. "She tried to blackmail me for a million pounds, I said no, because in England if you pay any money at all there must be something there. I said I'm not paying anything.

"Not sure I actually had a million at the time," he nervously laughed.

He continued: "It was a court case in France where you're guilty, which is one reason I don't vote to Remain in Europe. You're guilty until you're proved innocent.

"It's the totally opposite of when you're in England, and it's very difficult to prove you're innocent in another country in another language.

"And most people in England don't believe it, I didn't do it, you move on.

"It's a cross I have to bear, right or wrong, good or bad, I have to live with it.

"I'm clearing my mind and I believe most people in England believe it's not true."

The presenter continued to point out the criticisms from leading domestic violence charities of the knighthood.

"I don't care a toss about her love, it was 25 years ago, so you can take your political nature and do what you want to do with it.

"You want to talk to me about my knighthood it's very nice to have me, but I couldn't give a toss."

In 2017 Boycott was forced to apologise after he claimed he stood a better chance of gaining a knighthood if he "blacked up".

He said: "Mine's been turned down twice. I'd better black me face." Adina Clair from the of domestic abuse charity Women's Aid said: "Celebrating a man who was convicted for assaulting his partner sends a dangerous message - that domestic abuse is not taken seriously a crime. It is very disappointing."

MORE: Cressida Dick, Olly Robins and Kim Darroch listed in Theresa May's resignation honours

Kevin Maguire tweeted: "Three-month suspended sentence plus a £5,000 fine for assaulting a girlfriend and Geoffrey Boycott's still given a knighthood. Theresa May's proved no sister."

Alex Mac wrote: "Geoffrey Boycott claiming he supports Brexit because a French court convicted him of assaulting his girlfriend is peak 2019."

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