Majority of people are less confident about future of UK post-Brexit

PUBLISHED: 12:23 16 November 2016 | UPDATED: 15:27 16 November 2016

Poll by Panelbase. Total respondents: 2,031

Poll by Panelbase. Total respondents: 2,031

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A poll carried out for The New European even found a significant number of people who voted to quit the EU are fast losing confidence in Theresa May’s ability to successfully negotiate Brexit.

Confidence that Britain can make a success of Brexit has taken a massive hit since June 24.

A poll carried out for The New European even found a significant number of those people who voted to quit the EU are fast losing confidence in Theresa May’s ability to successfully negotiate Brexit.

Poll by Panelbase. Total respondents: 2,031Poll by Panelbase. Total respondents: 2,031

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We want to Remain, say 11 out of 13 polls since the Brexit vote

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The survey - conducted between November 4 and 7 with more than 2,000 British adults responding - shows the beginnings of a clear shift away from Leave.

Poll by Panelbase. Total respondents: 2,031Poll by Panelbase. Total respondents: 2,031

In total 63% of people are less confident about Britain’s future now we are heading for a Hard Brexit than they were prior to the vote. This includes a shift among Leave voters with 21% now worried about the direction in which the country is heading.

Many pollsters believe it was voter apathy on the Remain side, as well as positive polls in the days before the referendum, that led to Leave’s shock victory. Almost 13 million people who were registered to vote did not.

In our sample an overwhelming majority of those who did not cast a ballot - but now would - were in favour of the country remaining in the EU, a massive 76%.

The results also show that any apathy about the referendum before the vote is now disappearing and among those people who did not vote 85% are now less confident about Britain’s future.

When asked how they would vote in a second referendum 50.4% said they would vote to Remain.

With a raft of dire financial predictions since the vote and the Chancellor Philip Hammond warned this week by the Institute of Fiscal Studies that the UK’s deficit is set to grow it is not surprising that people are considering the impact Brexit will have on their own incomes.

Labour MP Chuka Ummuna, Speaking on behalf of campaign group Open Britain, said he believed the results showed a growing concern over the economic climate post-Brexit.

“The referendum split our country down the middle, and this poll suggests many Leave voters are concerned by the magnitude of the economic challenges Brexit has created,” he said.

“The only way the government can build a national consensus around Brexit is by keeping Britain in the single market and retaining close co-operation with the EU on issues like security and climate change.”

Conservative MP Anna Soubry added: “People who did not vote in the referendum – particularly young people whose future are now on the line – overwhelmingly supported our EU membership.

“That means the Government has to focus on keeping Britain open, tolerant and close to Europe in the future, and must reject a closed vision of Britain.”

Asked if a drop in their household income on the back of Brexit would sway their vote, 55% said they would have voted Remain.

Of the issues which framed the Brexit debate immigration remains the biggest concern with 36% saying that should be the government’s top priority during negotiations.

In total 36% respondents believed that the government alone should be able to ratify any new deal with the EU. However 24% said Parliament should get a vote on the final Brexit details and a further 23% said another referendum should be held to seal the deal.

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