More people voted against pro-Brexit parties than supported them in the election

PUBLISHED: 13:21 13 December 2019 | UPDATED: 16:21 14 December 2019

The figures suggest that more of the British public who voted are opposed to Brexit or want a second referendum than those who voted for parties that want the UK to leave the EU. Photo: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire

The figures suggest that more of the British public who voted are opposed to Brexit or want a second referendum than those who voted for parties that want the UK to leave the EU. Photo: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire

After the final votes were counted, it has become clear that collectively, more people voted for pro-Remain and second referendum backing parties, though first past the post ensured the Tories were able to get a majority.

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The combined total vote share for the pro-Brexit parties reached 47.33%, while on the other hand, Labour's vote share combined with the Liberal Democrats, SNP, Greens, Sinn Fein, Plaid Cymru and Alliance gives an overall share of 52.67%.

The figures suggest that more of the British public who voted are opposed to Brexit or want a second referendum than those who voted for parties that want the UK to leave the EU.

In the 2016 EU referendum, 52% of people voted Leave - suggesting a turnaround in attitude.

The figures show a failure of tactical voting, as many more seats could have been won by anti-Brexit parties if voters had cast their ballot tactically.

Others say the figures point towards a greater need for electoral reform, as different systems would allow for votes to be worth more.

The Electoral Reform Society have said the total number of voters for each party divided by the total number of seats they won finds that it took the Greens and Lib Dems the most number of voters per MP to get someone elected (respectively 864,743 and 334,122), while the Conservatives and SNP needed the least (at 38,300 and 25,882 each).

Caroline Lucas, Green MP for Brighton Pavilion, said: "No Boris Johnson, you do *not* have a 'powerful people's mandate' for your miserable Brexit deal.

"A majority of people voted for parties which opposed that deal and were pledging to put it back to the people in a second referendum."

Journalist Chris Kerr tweeted: "So collectively more people voted for remain/second referendum parties, but of course that gives Boris a 'mandate' for his Brexit deal. What an absolute state."

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