Nigel Farage suggests divine intervention saved him from plane crash in 2010

PUBLISHED: 10:42 12 February 2020 | UPDATED: 10:44 12 February 2020

Nigel Farage receives an honorary doctorate from Liberty University. Photograph: YouTube.

Nigel Farage receives an honorary doctorate from Liberty University. Photograph: YouTube.

Archant

Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage has said he realised he had been given a ‘purpose’ when he survived a plane crash during campaigning in the general election in 2010.

Become a Supporter

Almost four years after its creation The New European goes from strength to strength across print and online, offering a pro-European perspective on Brexit and reporting on the political response to the coronavirus outbreak, climate change and international politics. But we can only continue to grow with your support.

The Brexiteer was speaking after receiving an honorary doctorate from a fundamentalist Christian university that teaches against same-sex relationships.

The British politician had jetted over to Liberty University in Virginia, an institution that requires all students to sign a statement promising not to have gay sex, or sex with a transgender person, and where the president of the university even claims to have found a gay "cure".

In a presentation on stage before receiving the doctorate the audience were told that they "tried to kill him once", referencing a plane crash where a UKIP banner got caught up in a two-seater light aircraft.

He was interviewed by the university's vice-president for a podcast at the university afterwards, with Farage being asked about the incident.

Nigel Farage narrowly escapes death as his plane crashed to the ground at Hinton Airfield, Northamptonshire. He is pictured with UKIP's PR person Duncan Barkes. Photograph: Archant.Nigel Farage narrowly escapes death as his plane crashed to the ground at Hinton Airfield, Northamptonshire. He is pictured with UKIP's PR person Duncan Barkes. Photograph: Archant.

He said: "How on earth I survived I will never know."

When the interviewer suggested it was "God's providence and protection" in response, Farage replied: "I'm alive and he (the pilot, who survived the crash, but died in 2013) is not and I did think after I survived that perhaps, just perhaps, I was put here for a purpose."

Farage claimed that consequently any abuse or criticism he receives did not bother him.

"I climbed out of the wreckage of a light airplane crash, none of this stuff means anything to me."

He joked that being hit by a milkshake by comparison "is nothing".

Become a Supporter

Almost four years after its creation The New European goes from strength to strength across print and online, offering a pro-European perspective on Brexit and reporting on the political response to the coronavirus outbreak, climate change and international politics. But we can only rebalance the right wing extremes of much of the UK national press with your support. If you value what we are doing, you can help us by making a contribution to the cost of our journalism.

Become a supporter

You've seen the news, now discover the story

The New European is committed to providing in-depth analysis of the Brexit process, its implications and progress as well as celebrating European life.

Try 13 weeks for £20

Latest Articles

Most Read

latest issue

ANTI-BREXIT EVENTS

Find your nearest pro-European campaigning activities, talks, protests and events nationwide.