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The UK government is barrelling down the Brexit motorway while ignoring the no-deal shaped brick wall in front of it, writes MICHAEL WHITE.

The British public knew exactly what they were voting for, the Brexiteers tell us - but last night’s most-searched questions on Google suggest otherwise.

Ray Kershaw travels to a city which has been through many reincarnations over the centuries, but none so dramatic or violent as its most recent

A pioneering partnership between Google and a leading Dutch museum has brought together every surviving Vermeer painting for the first time ever and exhibited them online. FLORENCE HALLETT considers what it means for art.

Theresa May spent almost £100,000 on Facebook adverts promoting the Brexit deal before the vote was pulled.

Downing Street has spent more than £50,000 trying to promote the Brexit deal online.

Michael White on the increasingly hopeless manoeuvres from all sides as they realise the finish line is near.

MITCH BENN has a simple message for all of those considering marching on Saturday - get on the bus and turn up!

The protests against tuition fees, Grenfell, and Trump’s presidency have all evoked real anger. But that anger right now is missing from the Brexit fight. ANTONIA CUNDY says it’s time young people were more radical.

The Wooferendum march was ridiculously British but it was an example of people doing what they can to make the politicians sit up and take notice.

We pay for social media with our data. But not for much longer, says PARMY OLSON. With regulators getting tough and consumers more wary, we’re about to start paying in cash.

Advances in technology have created a new phenomenon – social warming – says leading tech writer CHARLES ARTHUR. And its effects are just as incendiary as those of global warming.

The war on plastic straws might make us all feel better but we shouldn’t mistake it for serious environmental progress, says TRACY KING. This battle is just the latest example of eco-misdirection.

The EU’s forthcoming anti-tax avoidance rules could be a big boost for our public services but, as Chevan Ilangaratne and Dami Olatuyi explain, they will be binned if Farage and Rees-Mogg get their way.

The New European’s handy guide to help you answer all those awkward questions and tricky situations you might find yourself in during your European holiday this summer.

How journalism sheds light on a murky referendum, Editor-at-large, ALASTAIR CAMPBELL writes

With rising tension over Trump’s zero tolerance immigration policy, PAUL CONNEW says the Republicans are moving to drop the president for the next election.

Society romanticises childbirth to the point women are not given a chance to cope with what is really involved, says CAROLINE CRIADO PEREZ

MICHAEL WHITE on May’s supposed ‘Brexit Dividend’ - and an alternative plan to revive and sustain the NHS

It is a familiar brand in the UK but almost unheard of in the US, where it is tainted with accusations of Chinese espionage. CHARLES TURNER reports.

The term suffragette was originally created to mock and belittle women, says linguist Deborah Cameron, and has only recently been reclaimed.

Medicine is one of history’s oldest patriarchies, says Tracy King, and its continuing inequalities explain why women turn to unproven alternatives.

Just as Britain edges closer to ditching the EU, new data protection laws from Brussels provide some much-needed safeguards and protections returning power to individuals over the handling of their most sensitive and personal data.

Richard Dawkins is one of the latest to consider a move to New Zealand following the election of Donald Trump and the Brexit vote.

Britain was arguably the birthplace of Artificial Intelligence. But ANGELA ​ JAMESON reveals, we are now losing ground

Rather than worry about AI becoming more human, we should be more concerned about the technology making us more artificial, argues Brendan Canavan

The latest allegations made about spending by Vote Leave during the referendum are gaining political traction. But it is worthwhile trying to leave the politics to one side, to concentrate, instead, on the claims from a legal perspective.

So. Yeah. Easter. Bit of a weird one. For all that Easter is in many ways the direct counterpart festival to Christmas, the yin to Yuletide’s yang, as it were, it’s always been very much the junior partner. It’s just not as big a deal, for all that in theological terms the two festivals ‘bookend’ the same story.

Jeremy Corbyn having sacked Owen Smith, the leader of the opposition is now closer to the government on Brexit than to a majority of Labour MPs, and a vast majority of the members he claims to listen to.

Images taken by a pioneering balloonist more than 100 years ago lay bare the impact of climate change on France’s biggest glacier, KIERAN BAXTER reports

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ANTI-BREXIT EVENTS

Grassroots anti-Brexit campaigners are increasing the pressure on politicians ahead of the meaningful vote. Here is a list of the events organised across the UK in the coming weeks.

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