United Nations

Benjamin Netanyahu has been a dominant force in Israeli politics for decades, but he could finally be doomed by corruption allegations and a coalescing opposition, says PAUL KNOTT.

The true significance of the other backstop - in Ireland - is often lost in the rhetoric. BARNABY TOWNS reports on what it represents

Slight easing of tensions between nuclear neighbours India and Pakistan cannot disguise the worsening chances of fixing this global fault-line, says PAUL KNOTT.

Vegan writer SELENE NELSON has found herself at the forefront of the war on meat after her exchange with Waitrose magazine editor William Sitwell went viral. She argues why meat-eating can no longer be considered a personal choice

The Olympic year represented a high point for a self-confident and outward-looking United Kingdom, says Sophia Deboick.

Twenty years since the shooting stopped in the Balkans, Denis MacShane asks if the region can yet move on from its bloody history

In an excoriating essay, ZOE WILLIAMS identifies the poison that has infected Britain's body politic, recovery from which has yet to even begin.

You can't discuss Richard Nixon without mentioning his downfall. But on the 50th anniversary of his inauguration, IAN WALKER considers his other legacy, as the man who fired the first shots of America's culture wars.

As other avenues are closed off to them, JOE WALLEN meets the desperate migrants in northern France willing to risk the perils of a Channel crossing in small craft.

Labour has defended Jeremy Corbyn's decision not to use Prime Minister's Questions to grill Theresa May on Brexit and the fallout from the government's defeats in the Commons.

Anti-Brexit campaigner David Lammy delivered one of the best speeches in the first day of the Brexit debate in the Commons.

Without the ghosts of the Iraq War haunting France, the country is taking a muscular approach with its military campaign in North Africa. But will it work? PAUL KNOTT reports

On the anniversary of Britain's last great international own goal, BARNABY TOWNS finds that the damage this time around is more severe.

Britain's small-scale fishermen are, without doubt, among the country's 'left behind'. But Brexit will not improve their lot. SIMON WATKINS reports.

HOWARD JACOBSON'S brilliant essay on toxic masculinity

The threat from climate change is as immediate as that from Brexit and the two problems must be tackled together.

CHARLIE CONNELLY examines the life of Russian journalist Anna Politkovskaya, August 30, 1958 - October 7, 2006

Self-styled lifestyle guru Jordan Peterson is among those taken in by a new study suggesting gender equality leads to both men and women gravitating towards traditional gender roles. It's bunkum, says CAROLINE CRIADO PEREZ

Research conducted among diplomats reveals an alarming decline in British influence, says JESS GIFKINS.

Putin is not as powerfulas he pretends, says prominent critic OLIVIER VEDRINE. And there is a way to get him...

With democracy and the rule of law on the back foot, could the region be returning to its darker days? Will Worley reports from Guatemala, one of the countries tipping towards crisis.

Advances in technology have created a new phenomenon - social warming - says leading tech writer CHARLES ARTHUR. And its effects are just as incendiary as those of global warming.

In an era of heightening global tensions, Martin Plaut finds an encouraging instance of two rivals burying the hatchet. He gives the inside story of an apparent instance of quickfire diplomacy

The German chancellor has become an anachronism from a bygone Europe, writes Paul Knott.

MICHAEL WHITE on May's supposed 'Brexit Dividend' - and an alternative plan to revive and sustain the NHS

Female refugees are facing countless threats all around the globe, says Samira Shackle. And their mistreatment doesn't end when they reach our shores.

How one case of forced marriage making its way to the UN court has marked the beginning of a shift in global feminism, Yasmin Alibhai Brown writes.

RICHARD LUCK ponders one of the great modern conspiracy theories

The EU and UN are held together by compromises and fudges; so some of their critics do have a point. But JAMES BALL asks; does that mean Britain can back out of the mess?

"Deal or no deal? It appears that Theresa May's big idea is not to have one": writes Michael White.

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