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Fox hunts the PR pound

The disgraced former minister is topping up his income with a lucrative retainer in the world of public relations

Former international trade secretary Liam Fox arrives in Downing Street. Photograph: Victoria Jones/PA. - Credit: Victoria Jones/PA.

With Boris Johnson forgotten but not gone, potential successors are now focusing on their campaign war chests.

Liam Fox, the disgraced former minister who had two cracks at the leadership, is now content, however, to focus solely on enriching himself. He has topped up the income he makes by writing for newspapers and a publishing contract with a lucrative retainer at Panama-based WorldPR, founded and chaired by controversial fixer Patrick Robertson.

The job, which will earn Fox £10,000 between March and August, is reported in the latest Register of Members’ Financial Interests. Of the gig, Fox says: “If required, I will provide advice on business and international politics.”

It’s Fox’s second six-month stint at the firm. Oddly, he has yet to do any work for the outfit, declaring under hours worked: “nil so far”. A blessing, perhaps, given that Robertson, an ardent Brexiteer who lives in St Moritz, has worked on campaigns for Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, the late Sir James Goldsmith’s Referendum party, Chechnya, and Augusto Pinochet.

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